[Ebook] ➠ The White Darkness By David Grann – Plummovies.info

[Ebook] ➠ The White Darkness  By David Grann – Plummovies.info My obsession with Antarctic explorers began when I was eleven and read The Great White South by Herbert Ponting, the photographer on the 1911 Scott expedition As a girl, I held a heroic idealization of Scott and his men freezing in their hut It seemed all so heroic, then Later readings lowered Scott in my estimation Henry Worsley idolized Ernest Shackleton for his courage and leadership Although Shackleton was never able to complete his expeditions, he did save his men s lives And Worsley My obsession with Antarctic explorers began when I was eleven and read The Great White South by Herbert Ponting, the photographer on the 1911 Scott expedition As a girl, I held a heroic idealization of Scott and his men freezing in their hut It seemed all so heroic, then Later readings lowered Scott in my estimation Henry Worsley idolized Ernest Shackleton for his courage and leadership Although Shackleton was never able to complete his expeditions, he did save his men s lives And Worsley s own grandfather had been with Shackleton on his failed expedition to the reach the South Pole.Henry made a career in the army, completing Special Forces training while pursuing his obsession by collecting Shackleton artifacts.The White Darkness by David Grann tells the story of how Henry Worsley, after retirement from the army, participated in a centennial expedition retracing Shackleton s trek, along with two other descendants of the original team The goal was to reach the South Pole, which Shackleton failed to do They made it Not content with this achievement, Henry afterward endeavored to complete the other journey that Shackleton had to abandon crossing the Antarctic Henry, though, would do it solo.Once again, I am amazed how men can be driven to endure the unimaginable physical stress of the Antarctic, not just once, but returning again to the dangerous beauty of ice A hundred years ago men wanted to bring honor to their country and the Antarctic and Arctic were the last unexplored places on earth But there has always been something , a need for men to test themselves to the ultimate, to conquer the most extreme conditions imaginableIn this short book about Henry Worsley, Grann covers the history of Antarctic exploration and conveys a chilling exposure to the white darkness of the freezing desert landscape that has lured so many men to their deaths.I received a free ebook from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and unbiased review By The New York Times Bestselling Author Of Killers Of The Flower Moon , A Powerful True Story Of Adventure And Obsession In The Antarctic, Lavishly Illustrated With Color Photographs Henry Worsley Was A Devoted Husband And Father And A Decorated British Special Forces Officer Who Believed In Honor And Sacrifice He Was Also A Man Obsessed He Spent His Life Idolizing Ernest Shackleton, The Nineteenth Century Polar Explorer, Who Tried To Become The First Person To Reach The South Pole, And Later Sought To Cross Antarctica On Foot Shackleton Never Completed His Journeys, But He Repeatedly Rescued His Men From Certain Death, And Emerged As One Of The Greatest Leaders In HistoryWorsley Felt An Overpowering Connection To Those Expeditions He Was Related To One Of Shackleton S Men, Frank Worsley, And Spent A Fortune Collecting Artifacts From Their Epic Treks Across The Continent He Modeled His Military Command On Shackleton S Legendary Skills And Was Determined To Measure His Own Powers Of Endurance Against Them He Would Succeed Where Shackleton Had Failed, In The Most Brutal Landscape In The WorldIn , Worsley Set Out Across Antarctica With Two Other Descendants Of Shackleton S Crew, Battling The Freezing, Desolate Landscape, Life Threatening Physical Exhaustion, And Hidden Crevasses Yet When He Returned Home He Felt Compelled To Go Back On November , At Age , Worsley Bid Farewell To His Family And Embarked On His Most Perilous Quest To Walk Across Antarctica AloneDavid Grann Tells Worsley S Remarkable Story With The Intensity And Power That Have Led Him To Be Called Simply The Best Narrative Nonfiction Writer Working Today Illustrated With Than Fifty Stunning Photographs From Worsley S And Shackleton S Journeys, The White Darkness Is Both A Gorgeous Keepsake Volume And A Spellbinding Story Of Courage, Love, And A Man Pushing Himself To The Extremes Of Human Capacity I reckon I lost about three miles distance today from snaking around, head permanently bowed to read the compass, just my shuffling skis to look at for nine hours Anyway, I m back on track and now happy I can part a straight line, even through another day of the white darkness Radio broadcast by Henry Worsley, two weeks into a solo transantarctic crossingAuthor David Grann is known for spinning fascinating narrative nonfiction as with Killers of the Flower Moon and The Lost City of Z , and I reckon I lost about three miles distance today from snaking around, head permanently bowed to read the compass, just my shuffling skis to look at for nine hours Anyway, I m back on track and now happy I can part a straight line, even through another day of the white darkness Radio broadcast by Henry Worsley, two weeks into a solo transantarctic crossingAuthor David Grann is known for spinning fascinating narrative nonfiction as with Killers of the Flower Moon and The Lost City of Z , and frequent readers of his essays in The New Yorker might well assume that whatever is intriguing Grann at the moment will eventually be spun into a tale that will intrigue them, too Even so, I found The White Darkness to be a little thin at only 140 pages, including dozens of beautiful full page photographs, I really don t think that Grann made full use of what is, in fact, a potentially spellbinding tale And, in fact, I don t know that the book much improves upon Grann s original article on Worsley s story in The New Yorker The pictures in this slim volume, however, are admittedly stunning.The format of the story is well chosen We begin with Henry Worsley as he struggles to do what no one has done before cross the continent of Antarctica by his own power, with no outside help, no prearranged food caches along the way, or even a cup of tea at the South Pole station that he passes en route As his body weakens and his stomach cramps, Worsley must consider the lessons of the two earliest South Pole explorers who have fascinated him all of his life Sir Ernest Shackleton, who turned back when a couple days short of the South Pole in order to get his men home safely and Captain Robert Scott, who eventually did reach the Pole, and died alongside his crew on the return trip The question Worsley must answer for himself Is it truly better to be a live donkey than a dead lion The book then goes over a very brief history of Antarctic exploration, followed by a very brief history of Henry Worsley s life he was always intrigued by tales of South Pole exploration, was fascinated to learn that he is distantly related to one of Shackleton s crew, joined the British army and did two tours with the SAS When one of Shackleton s descendants reached out to ask Worsley if he d like to join him and another early explorer s descendant to attempt to complete the trek to the South Pole at the centenary of their ancestors failed attempt, Worsley jumped at the chance The book covers that trip, a later polar trek that Worsley joins, and eventually, after Worsley ages out of the army at 55 and promises his family that his dream of a solo Antarctic crossing would be the last time he ever left them, we rejoin the story from the beginning trudging along with Worsley as he skis and hikes and tows his sledge, avoiding crevasses, and making his solitary way through the mind and muscle numbing white darkness.There s plenty of meat here for a full length book, and I feel like Grann sold the story short I do not feel fulfilled by this Naturally, I kept reading to learn of Worsley s fate, but I would have happily stayed in this icebound world for quite a while longer Disclaimer ARC via Netgalley You might not recognize Henry Worsley s name, but you mostly likely have heard the story At the end of 2015 the beginning of 2016, he attempted to cross Antarctica alone, but sicken, was airlifted, and, sadly, died while doctors while trying to save his life His quest, done in part as a fundraiser, was followed by the media and classrooms He received support from the royal family If you are like me, you were impressed by the drive and the attempt, but also wonde Disclaimer ARC via Netgalley You might not recognize Henry Worsley s name, but you mostly likely have heard the story At the end of 2015 the beginning of 2016, he attempted to cross Antarctica alone, but sicken, was airlifted, and, sadly, died while doctors while trying to save his life His quest, done in part as a fundraiser, was followed by the media and classrooms He received support from the royal family If you are like me, you were impressed by the drive and the attempt, but also wondering why David Grann s White Darkness does a good job at answering a question whose best answer till now has been because it s there Grann is perhaps the best teller of true stories working right now This short book showcases his shorter work the story appeared in The New Yorker , and proves that his short profiles can be just as riveting As Grann notes, Worsley was obsessed with Shackleton an artic explorer who is better know for his failures where people didn t starve to death than anything else Unlike Amundsen who made it or Scott who died the stiff upper lip way, Shackleton got his people home Worsley s obsession seems in part because of a family connection his ancestor Frank worked with Shackleton In fact, prior to his solo attempt, Worsley had done a three person hike with Will Gow a descendent of Shackleton and Henry Adams a grandson of Jameson Boyd Worsley s obsession too does seem to be a case of hero worship, he makes on interesting pilgrimage to Shackleton s grave Grann presents a quick overview of Worsley s life, giving the reader a sense of who was lost, and not just a vague or abstract tragedy While Grann never says, this is why, he does a great job of allowing the reader to get a sense of the drive and determination that fueled Worsley s quest, but also to see the family that supported him The long essay is supplemented by photos, and the tone itself is one of remembrance, butpeaceful or comprehensive than an obituary This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here The White Darkness follows Henry Worsley on his two treks through Antarctica to follow in the footsteps of his hero, Ernest Shakleton I learned a lot about the continent and about how grueling it is to even spend a day there, let alone months at a time Worsley is brave, driven, and admirable This is a must read This story about Henry Worsley and his quest to follow Shackleton s footsteps to the Antarctica covers two expeditions, the second solo Biographical information is solid and you want Worsley to succeed Those interested in Shackleton will be intrigued.Copy provided by the Publisher and NetGalley This review covers the essay found in Feb 12 19 of The New yorker I don t usually review essays but David Grann is an author whose books I ll always read This is a marvellous look at the life story of Henry Worsley, a descendant of one of the members of Ernest Shackleton s crew Worsley is an adventurous explorer by nature and among his many exploits he came up with the idea of following in Shackleton s last footsteps with two other Shackleton descendants and later to cross the southernmost co This review covers the essay found in Feb 12 19 of The New yorker I don t usually review essays but David Grann is an author whose books I ll always read This is a marvellous look at the life story of Henry Worsley, a descendant of one of the members of Ernest Shackleton s crew Worsley is an adventurous explorer by nature and among his many exploits he came up with the idea of following in Shackleton s last footsteps with two other Shackleton descendants and later to cross the southernmost continent solo David Grann writes non fiction like a novel His flowing narrative is as captivating as his readers have come to expect I d never heard of Worsley before but am a great reader concerning exploration of either pole David Grann has been one of my favorite New Yorker reporters for years, ever since I read his Trial by Fire, a fascinating look at a case of arson, written with fantastic verve and twists and turns I ve since enjoyed almost everything he s done, especially the stories on men s obsessions that take them to dark places The White Darkness is another great job of reporting, originally published in The New Yorker, and I m thrilled it is being published in book form.In The White Darkness Grann tak David Grann has been one of my favorite New Yorker reporters for years, ever since I read his Trial by Fire, a fascinating look at a case of arson, written with fantastic verve and twists and turns I ve since enjoyed almost everything he s done, especially the stories on men s obsessions that take them to dark places The White Darkness is another great job of reporting, originally published in The New Yorker, and I m thrilled it is being published in book form.In The White Darkness Grann takes us to Antarctica, following the obsession of Henry Worsley, who, in 2015, at 55 years old, embarked on a solo venture across Antarctica, hoping to follow the course that his hero, Sir Ernest Shackleton, tried and failed to conquer 100 years prior.To tell this story, Grann spends a good amount of time looking at Shackleton s own journeys, looking at why Worsley thought he was an admirable leader Grann also looks at Worsley s prior visits to Antarctica, in 2008 and 2011, when he successfully retraced other famous Antarctic exploration routes from 100 years prior.These are fascinating stories of human planning, training, endurance, and foolhardiness It makes you wonder the purpose of it all At the same time, it is entirely understandable There is beauty in exploration and testing humanity There is wonder on earth The White Darkness also asks, What is failure Shackleton, after all, relatively close to his destination, called off his own trans Antarctic venture He and his crew survived In contrast, Shackleton s contemporary and competitor Robert Scott, the second just five weeks after Amundsen to make it to the South Pole, is often criticized for not giving up, losing himself and his crew in 1912 Worsley has to fight this demon when times get dark does he fail to meet his destination and thus succeed in surviving, like his hero, or does he stubbornly push himself across the threshold that will lead to his demise A good, short little read where descendants of polar explorers decide to recreate their ancestors trips The premise is great but the book is very short, leaving out much of the detail about hazardous exploration that makes it so much fun to read about This isof an article than a true book.I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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